Reinventing Fire

It’s a Wrap!

May 31, 2013

Filed under: SVG,SVG 2,Text — Magister @ 2:50 am

I’ve long been an advocate of wrapping (or “flowing” or “multi-line”) text in SVG. This is basic functionality, and people have been asking for it since SVG started.

I’m also an advocate for moving features out of SVG and into CSS, like gradients, animation, compositing, filters, and so on; the benefits of a single code base for HTML and SVG applications, and ease of learning and maintenance, are obvious.

So, I was excited when the CSS WG took up work to allow wrapping text to arbitrary shapes, like circles or stars, not just boxes. This will enable a whole new magazine-style layout that will benefit web sites and ebooks alike. But I was disappointed when I found out that this work had some recent setbacks and delays.

So, I’m calling for a simple solution now, while we wait for the more complete solution later. And the nice thing is, my solution also relies on CSS!

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Pointers on Background of SVG Borders on Mutiny

August 21, 2010

Filed under: CDF,Standards,SVG,SVG 2,Technical,W3C,Work — Magister @ 5:37 pm

With SVG being integrated more and more into HTML5, both included via <object> and <img> elements, and inline in the same document, some natural questions about SVG and CSS are receiving more focus. This includes box model questions like background and border, and pointer events.

I’m interested in comments from the community on what direction SVG should take.

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Getting to the Point

July 13, 2010

Filed under: Standards,SVG,SVG 2,Tech,W3C,Work — Magister @ 11:18 am

SVG paths have a pretty good set of shape commands, enough to let you draw any 2D shape you might want in an authoring tool: horizontal, vertical, and diagonal straight lines, elliptical arc segments, and cubic and quadratic Bézier curves. Béziers are great, giving you precise control over the position and curve interpolation of each point in a concise format, using control points (“handles”), and are easily chained together to create complex shapes.

But let’s say you have a series of points, and you want to draw a smooth line between them, e.g. for stock data, an audio wave, or a mathematical graphing equation. Béziers are not as handy there, because not all the points needed to define a Bézier spline are on the curve itself. Obviously, you can decompose any set of points into a set of Béziers, but that takes math, and who wants to do that? (Put your hand down, nerd. I’m talking to the normals.)

Sometimes, you just want to lay down a set of points, and let the browser draw a smooth curve (unlike polylines, where each segment is just a straight line between the points). Like this:

Please use a modern browser.
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